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collaboration


Vincent Price Art Museum

For the third year of /fiveThe Huntington is collaborating with the Vincent Price Art Museum to invite noted artists Carolina Caycedo (b. 1978) and Mario Ybarra Jr. (b. 1973) to explore The Huntington’s collections and create new works around the theme of “identity.” The project will culminate in an exhibition at The Huntington in the fall of 2018, with a complementary exhibition at the Vince Price Art Museum.

 

Founded in 1957 with a gift of 90 art objects from the actor Vincent Price, the Vincent Price Art Museum now houses seven galleries, art storage, and a multimedia lecture hall as part of the 160,000 square foot Performing and Fine Arts Center at East Los Angeles College. The museum serves as an educational resource for the college’s diverse audiences and communities through the exhibition, interpretation, collection, and preservation of works in all media of the visual arts.

projects


Carolina Caycedo


Born in London to Colombian parents, Carolina Caycedo has lived and worked in Los Angeles since 2012. She has developed publicly engaged projects in major cities across the globe, from Bogota to London, New York to Paris, and San Juan to Tijuana. Her work has been exhibited at several international biennials, and has been the subject of solo shows in galleries from Los Angeles to Berlin.  Her artist book “Serpent River Book” was part of the recent “A Universal History of Infamy” exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). She also will participate in the Hammer Museum’s “Made in LA 2018” exhibition.

 

Carolina Caycedo has ranged widely across the Huntington’s three collecting areas, and her project is guided by the Aymara aphorism qhip nayr uñtasis sarnaqapxañani or looking back to walk forth. She is planning a multimedia installation comprised of two new pieces: an audiovisual projection, and an arrangement of images and texts, which together reveal the past as a rebel agent that haunts human certainty of dominion. In a performance choreographed with Marina Magalhães, Caycedo filmed dancers in locations across The Huntington, activating bodies of color within the collections and conjuring invisible accounts of past and future through movement, word, and gesture. The film and images will address diverse topics such as water development, bodies at work, and Latinx American artists.

 

Mario Ybarra Jr.

Mario Ybarra Jr. is an artist, educator, and activist involved in the Mexican-American community and street culture of greater Los Angeles. He creates sculptures, installations, photographs, and activist interventions to examine Mexican-American identity and is co-founder of Slanguage, an artist group based in Wilmington, Calif.  He has had numerous solo exhibitions in cities such as Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Torino, and Zurich.  His work was featured in exhibitions that include “Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement” at LACMA, the 2008 Whitney Biennial, and the 2006 Prague Biennial.
 

Mario Ybarra has found source material throughout The Huntington’s galleries and grounds to inform his drawing practice. With a focus on illuminated 15th– and 16th– century manuscripts as well as prints by Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528). Ybarra is finding striking resonances in the early iconography with contemporary “cholo” culture and symbols, elements that he plans to integrate into a series of drawings, etchings, and large-scale graphics for the exhibition. A teacher at heart, Ybarra intends to utilize the grounds of The Huntington for a “Drawing Club” with students from East Los Angeles College (ELAC) during the run of the exhibition, leading workshops as a way to generate discussion, shared perspectives, and dialogue.

Carolina Caycedo


Born in London to Colombian parents, Carolina Caycedo has lived and worked in Los Angeles since 2012. She has developed publicly engaged projects in major cities across the globe, from Bogota to London, New York to Paris, and San Juan to Tijuana. Her work has been exhibited at several international biennials, and has been the subject of solo shows in galleries from Los Angeles to Berlin.  Her artist book “Serpent River Book” was part of the recent “A Universal History of Infamy” exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). She also will participate in the Hammer Museum’s “Made in LA 2018” exhibition.

 

Carolina Caycedo has ranged widely across the Huntington’s three collecting areas, and her project is guided by the Aymara aphorism qhip nayr uñtasis sarnaqapxañani or looking back to walk forth. She is planning a multimedia installation comprised of two new pieces: an audiovisual projection, and an arrangement of images and texts, which together reveal the past as a rebel agent that haunts human certainty of dominion. In a performance choreographed with Marina Magalhães, Caycedo filmed dancers in locations across The Huntington, activating bodies of color within the collections and conjuring invisible accounts of past and future through movement, word, and gesture. The film and images will address diverse topics such as water development, bodies at work, and Latinx American artists.

 

Mario Ybarra Jr.

Mario Ybarra Jr. is an artist, educator, and activist involved in the Mexican-American community and street culture of greater Los Angeles. He creates sculptures, installations, photographs, and activist interventions to examine Mexican-American identity and is co-founder of Slanguage, an artist group based in Wilmington, Calif.  He has had numerous solo exhibitions in cities such as Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Torino, and Zurich.  His work was featured in exhibitions that include “Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement” at LACMA, the 2008 Whitney Biennial, and the 2006 Prague Biennial.
 

Mario Ybarra has found source material throughout The Huntington’s galleries and grounds to inform his drawing practice. With a focus on illuminated 15th- and 16th- century manuscripts as well as prints by Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528). Ybarra is finding striking resonances in the early iconography with contemporary “cholo” culture and symbols, elements that he plans to integrate into a series of drawings, etchings, and large-scale graphics for the exhibition. A teacher at heart, Ybarra intends to utilize the grounds of The Huntington for a “Drawing Club” with students from East Los Angeles College (ELAC) during the run of the exhibition, leading workshops as a way to generate discussion, shared perspectives, and dialogue.

events


Events generated through The Huntington’s year-long collaboration with the Vincent Price Art Museum in 2018 will be listed here as they are announced.

Bodies of Lineage
9.14.17 (Thursday) 7pm
@ Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington


A movement, a moment—a fleeting phrase to remind you of where you began and who you’ve become. Join us for an intimate evening of song, dance, and narrative in an event crafted by artist Jheanelle Garriques of Naked Narratives, in collaboration with the Sokamba Performing Arts Company. The presentation is inspired by the 18th-century feminist Elizabeth Montagu, founder of the literary salon known as the Blue Stockings Society. Montagu’s papers are part of The Huntington’s collections. In Montagu’s tradition, Naked Narratives has hosted feminist coteries around the globe using storytelling to uplift and empower marginalized voices. This presentation will feature queer and femme poets, musicians, and dancers of color sharing their stories, engaging with themes rooted in the body and the human experience.

Location: Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

 

Lesbian Pulp
9.29.17 (Friday) 7–10pm
10.7.17 (Saturday) 4–9pm
10.8.17 (Sunday) 5–9pm
@ Women’s Center for Creative Work

Artist Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh) leads a series of paper-making workshops in a program called Lesbian Pulp, an experiment in queer community, storytelling, and historiography.  Participants will use recycled materials (such as lesbian pulp novels and personal ephemera) to create paper on which to write love letters and stories of encounter. The program is a component of “What You Love,” a project produced by Loveday as part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Participants may attend individual sessions or the full series. Free; advanced reservations required.

For more information, contact info@wccw.us

 

Location: Women’s Center for Creative Work

Session descriptions:

9.29.17 – Potluck and show-and-tell. Participants should bring materials they wish to recycle into “lesbian pulp.” The group will get to know each other in a casual social environment by sharing the stories of the materials they’ve brought. A movie screening and discussion of a mystery lesbian pulp film will conclude the evening.

10.7.17 – Paper-making workshop. Participants will be guided through the process of paper-making, using materials they have brought to recycle into “lesbian pulp.” Over a casual potluck dinner, the group will share stories and work collaboratively.

10.8.17 – Storytelling and letter writing workshop. Participants will share, work collaboratively, and write their stories or letters on the paper they have made.

Garden Tour Series
A Walk on the Prickly Side: The Desert Garden at The Huntington
11.11.17 (Saturday) 9:30–10:30am
Cactus Amongst Us: Neighborhood Tour in Highland Park
11.11.17 (Saturday) 4pm
Downtown Desert: Landscape Tour at Grand Park
11.12.17 (Sunday) 2 pm

Botanist Zya Levy will lead a series of walking tours exploring the botanical histories and cultural uses of plants that can be found growing throughout Southern California—in The Huntington’s 10-acre Desert Garden, around a local community, and in a downtown Los Angeles park. Tours will highlight plants that are common horticulturally but rare in the wild, and will include discussion about the effects of botanical collections on biodiversity in both urban and wild spaces.  This program is a part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Free; reservations required. Space is limited.

For more information, contact info@wccw.us

 

LOCATIONS:

Desert Garden, The Huntington
Highland Park, CA
Grand Park, Downtown L.A.

exhibition: exhibition 

Exhibition: COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington
11.18.17–2.12.18


The exhibition “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington,” on view in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art from Nov. 18, 2017 through Feb. 12, 2018, features an installation of paintings, sculpture, a textile, video, writings, and other new works by artists Olivia Chumacero, Sarita Dougherty, Jheanelle Garriques, Zya S. Levy, Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh), Soyoung Shin, and Juliana Wisdom.

Live Free or Die:
Artist Talk with Soyoung Shin and Juliana Wisdom
1.27.18 (Saturday) 2pm
@ Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

Artists Soyoung Shin and Juliana Wisdom will discuss the influences of French history on their new work, inspired by French decorative art at The Huntington. The conversation is moderated by Catherine Hess, chief curator of European art at The Huntington and interim director of the Art Collections. Shin’s project, “Picture Elements” (named for the words from which “pixel” is derived) focuses on the 18th-century carpets and tapestries commissioned by King Louis XIV for the Grand Gallery of the Louvre, and explores the ways in which the textile craft overlaps with modern computing.  Wisdom is developing new work in response to The Huntington’s 18th-century French porcelain collection. Emulating the Sèvres Manufactory’s techniques with both traditional and new materials, Wisdom has created sculptures that seek to broaden the historical narrative of Sèvres production by including the often-anonymous women who served as both makers and benefactors. This program is a part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Free; no reservations required.

Location: Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

stories


aboutsm_five


/five is a contemporary art initiative centered on five year-long collaborations between The Huntington and a variety of arts and cultural organizations. The aim is to engage The Huntington’s rich library, garden, and art collections in new and thought-provoking ways. Possible outcomes include site-specific installations, educational programming, performance pieces, sound work, film, or myriad other art forms.

 

Each year’s collaboration will be announced toward the start of the calendar year. Information, photos, and stories about each collaboration and the associated artworks and events will be added to this site as they become available.