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Women’s Center for Creative Work

For the second year of the contemporary art initiative /five, The Huntington partnered with the Women’s Center for Creative Work (WCCW) and selected seven artists to create new works investigating the theme of collecting and collections. These works are on view in “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington” from Nov. 18, 2017, through Feb. 12, 2018 in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art at The Huntington.

 

The seven artists conducted research across The Huntington’s library, art, and botanical holdings, making artworks in response to those objects. The resulting paintings, sculpture, textile, video, audio, and writings are meant to engage, provoke, and inspire Huntington audiences.

 

Founded in 2013, WCCW is a Los Angeles–based nonprofit organization that cultivates feminist creative communities and practices through its facilities, residency programs, and rapidly growing network of over 15,000 followers.

projects


Jheanelle Garriques


In 2014, when she was still a student at USC, poet, dancer, and performer Jheanelle Garriques started her writing salon, Naked Narratives. She wanted to create a space for femme-identified people from a variety of backgrounds to explore their lived experiences through the written word. During her residency at The Huntington, she pored over the letters of Lady Elizabeth Robinson Montagu, a British aristocrat who started what was in many ways a feminist salon in London, circa 1760. The Huntington holds more than 7,000 of Montagu’s papers. “I’m trying to draw a thread through the experiences of these people working in 18th-century Britain and the femmes that I’m working with,” says Garriques, who hosted five salons with seven femme participants at The Huntington this summer. At the first meeting, they wrote about lips; at the second, hands; and at subsequent meetings, hair, eyes, and finally skin. Then together, in collaboration with the Sokamba Performing Arts Company, Garriques and her salon members hosted a night of dance, music, and narrative called “Bodies of Lineage.” They translated Montagu’s words and their own into movement. “In this performance and overall project, I really sought to uncover the living, breathing aspects of writing as a conduit for human connection,” says Garriques. A photograph from the performance appears as a design element in the culminating /five exhibition, “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington,” along with writings by Naked Narrative salon participants and letters by Montagu and her peers, making connections between feminists of the past and present.

 

Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh)


On February 23, 1900, police arrested actress Olga Nethersole at a theater in New York City and charged her with “giving indecent and immoral public exhibition.” She had been performing on stage as a modernized version of Sappho, the ancient Greek female writer famed for her poems about female love, in an openly sexual manner. The scandal surrounding Nethersole’s performance intrigued Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh), an experimental filmmaker working on her doctorate in Film and Digital Media at University of California, Santa Cruz. Renowned as Sappho may be, little historical information about her life exists. But imagined versions of her story abound in film and literature. During her residency at The Huntington, Loveday studied hundreds of references made to Sappho in the Library’s archive. Because queer love stories are often omitted from the historical record, she also spent her residency collecting them. She has sent letters—written on handmade stationery made from pages of her own copies of Alphonse Daudet’s popular 19th-century novel Sappho—to LGBTQ individuals and organizations, asking for first-person recollections of love stories. The building of the archive is an ongoing project called “What You Love,” and Loveday is exhibiting some of the letters, poems, and stories she’s collected in a vitrine at the exhibition “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington.” Since Loveday is asking that people share their stories, she felt it important to share some of her own as well; versions of four of the handcrafted letters she sent out are on view. A turn-of-the-century writing desk is included in the exhibition as well, so visitors can contribute to “What You Love.” Visitors may also browse a collection of books about queer history included in the installation and on loan from the Feminist Library On Wheels and Loveday’s own collection.

 

Soyoung Shin


The ornately detailed Beauvais tapestries that hang in The Huntington’s galleries likely once had royal arms along the top borders. The arms are gone now—after the French Revolution, craftspeople replaced them with a decorative, gold-colored border. The tapestries, designed by artist Francois Boucher and made by the Beauvais Tapestry Manufactory between 1757 and 1760, inspired artist Soyoung Shin, who was interested in making her own revisionist history textile. She was also interested in the relationship between textiles and the evolution of computing. Shin cites the loom that Frenchman Joseph Jacquard designed in 1804, which used punch cards to store weaving instructions. This practice formed the basis for modern computing. All modern computing, despite the endemic sexism in the industry, thus stems from a craft now conventionally, if inaccurately, viewed as feminine. During her time in residence at The Huntington, Shin designed two tapestries of her own that were woven by a Belgian factory in Flanders. She based one on a 1946 photo of eight men standing in front of ENIAC, among the earliest general computers ever made. None of the women involved in building ENIAC were included in that postwar image. To both emphasize and rectify that historic erasure, Shin extracted the men in the first tapestry and replaced them with images from the second tapestry—based on a painting by Melanie Florio that Shin had commissioned—which depicts women central to computing history: ENIAC programmers Betty Holberton and Jean Bartik, textile artist and scholar Anni Albers, mathematician Ada Lovelace, and Navy programmer Grace Hopper.

 

Juliana Wisdom


“It’s just kind of bursting at the seams with opulence and femininity,” artist Juliana Wisdom says of historic, decorative porcelain. Her research centered around The Huntington’s collection of Sèvres porcelain. It was all made in the 18th and 19th centuries, often by uncredited women who worked from home, carting delicate objects back and forth to the Sèvres manufactory. She searched for traces of these female workers in the Sèvres manufactory directories owned by The Huntington, and also researched the women who patronized the manufactory. Her research informed the ceramic sculptures—multiple vessels, a wig, and a wig stand—that she made herself. Her vessels not only incorporate decorative elements inspired by Sèvres porcelain, but also suggest, through their forms and the imagery, a different story about women’s labor. The vessel titled Three Graces and Marie Antoinette features a painted portrait of the executed queen, who invested in decorative porcelain. The “graces” who surround her represent three classes: common people, the bourgeoisie, and the aristocracy. In exploring and reimaging the legacy of the Sèvres manufactory, Wisdom is acknowledging both female labor and the class struggles affecting life in 18th- and 19th-century France. “Studying how these objects were made and who made them can be a way to transform how we think about history,” she says.

 

Olivia Chumacero and Sarita Dougherty


Painter Sarita Dougherty usually works from life, so she brought her oil paints to The Huntington’s gardens. Her collaborator, Olivia Chumacero, brought her video camera and sound equipment, and the two worked to capture the symbiotic relationships of plants growing in the gardens. In the past, Dougherty and Chumacero have worked collaboratively on research, performances, and installations honoring nature. Chumacero founded the organization Everything is Medicine, an organization that teaches people about indigenous uses of California flora. The two artists worked primarily in an uncultivated area of The Huntington’s grounds not open to the public, where the plants are much less manicured. In the spring, they took inspiration from the Ceonothus, or California lilac, bloom. In autumn, both connected with the elegant Oaxacan weeping pine. Dougherty created two paintings and designed wallpaper depicting California plants and animals at The Huntington. Chumacero filmed the spring bloom and dormant season on the grounds, recording sounds of the gardens to accompany her footage. Together, the two artists captured this ecosystem’s interrelationships and its connection to humanity.

 

Zya Levy


“I really view plants as storytellers,” says botanist and artist Zya Levy. At The Huntington, Levy explored different kinds of narratives—for instance, that of the golden barrel cactus, of which The Huntington has 500 specimens. The ball-shaped plant once existed only in a volcanic valley in Mexico. Thanks to over-zealous plant collectors and flooding caused by a dam project, the cactus became endangered in its native habitat. Counterintuitively, the golden barrel is now ubiquitous in Los Angeles as a landscaping choice. Levy’s interest in the effects that plant collecting and its legacy have on everyday realities informed her work at The Huntington. She made 300 plaster casts of cacti, based on models found at Home Depot, Sal’s Cactus Mart in Filmore, California, and on street corners. 150 of these are on view in “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington.” Levy also recorded ambient sounds in Eaton Canyon, L.A.’s streets, The Huntington’s gardens, and in New Mexico. The sounds narrate the movement of species from wild to urban settings, and from uncultivated to cultivated environments. In addition, she planned three hour-long walking tours for the public: one in downtown L.A., one in Highland Park, and one in The Huntington’s Desert Garden. At these tours, Levy told the stories of plants that grow in these environments, emphasizing where they come from, what they’ve been used for, and why they’re here now.

 

Jheanelle Garriques


In 2014, when she was still a student at USC, poet, dancer, and performer Jheanelle Garriques started her writing salon, Naked Narratives. She wanted to create a space for femme-identified people from a variety of backgrounds to explore their lived experiences through the written word. During her residency at The Huntington, she pored over the letters of Lady Elizabeth Robinson Montagu, a British aristocrat who started what was in many ways a feminist salon in London, circa 1760. The Huntington holds more than 7,000 of Montagu’s papers. “I’m trying to draw a thread through the experiences of these people working in 18th-century Britain and the femmes that I’m working with,” says Garriques, who hosted five salons with seven femme participants at The Huntington this summer. At the first meeting, they wrote about lips; at the second, hands; and at subsequent meetings, hair, eyes, and finally skin. Then together, in collaboration with the Sokamba Performing Arts Company, Garriques and her salon members hosted a night of dance, music, and narrative called “Bodies of Lineage.” They translated Montagu’s words and their own into movement. “In this performance and overall project, I really sought to uncover the living, breathing aspects of writing as a conduit for human connection,” says Garriques. A photograph from the performance appears as a design element in the culminating /five exhibition, “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington,” along with writings by Naked Narrative salon participants and letters by Montagu and her peers, making connections between feminists of the past and present.

 

Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh)


On February 23, 1900, police arrested actress Olga Nethersole at a theater in New York City and charged her with “giving indecent and immoral public exhibition.” She had been performing on stage as a modernized version of Sappho, the ancient Greek female writer famed for her poems about female love, in an openly sexual manner. The scandal surrounding Nethersole’s performance intrigued Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh), an experimental filmmaker working on her doctorate in Film and Digital Media at University of California, Santa Cruz. Renowned as Sappho may be, little historical information about her life exists. But imagined versions of her story abound in film and literature. During her residency at The Huntington, Loveday studied hundreds of references made to Sappho in the Library’s archive. Because queer love stories are often omitted from the historical record, she also spent her residency collecting them. She has sent letters—written on handmade stationery made from pages of her own copies of Alphonse Daudet’s popular 19th-century novel Sappho—to LGBTQ individuals and organizations, asking for first-person recollections of love stories. The building of the archive is an ongoing project called “What You Love,” and Loveday is exhibiting some of the letters, poems, and stories she’s collected in a vitrine at the exhibition “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington.” Since Loveday is asking that people share their stories, she felt it important to share some of her own as well; versions of four of the handcrafted letters she sent out are on view. A turn-of-the-century writing desk is included in the exhibition as well, so visitors can contribute to "What You Love." Visitors may also browse a collection of books about queer history included in the installation and on loan from the Feminist Library On Wheels and Loveday’s own collection.

 

Soyoung Shin


The ornately detailed Beauvais tapestries that hang in The Huntington’s galleries likely once had royal arms along the top borders. The arms are gone now—after the French Revolution, craftspeople replaced them with a decorative, gold-colored border. The tapestries, designed by artist Francois Boucher and made by the Beauvais Tapestry Manufactory between 1757 and 1760, inspired artist Soyoung Shin, who was interested in making her own revisionist history textile. She was also interested in the relationship between textiles and the evolution of computing. Shin cites the loom that Frenchman Joseph Jacquard designed in 1804, which used punch cards to store weaving instructions. This practice formed the basis for modern computing. All modern computing, despite the endemic sexism in the industry, thus stems from a craft now conventionally, if inaccurately, viewed as feminine. During her time in residence at The Huntington, Shin designed two tapestries of her own that were woven by a Belgian factory in Flanders. She based one on a 1946 photo of eight men standing in front of ENIAC, among the earliest general computers ever made. None of the women involved in building ENIAC were included in that postwar image. To both emphasize and rectify that historic erasure, Shin extracted the men in the first tapestry and replaced them with images from the second tapestry—based on a painting by Melanie Florio that Shin had commissioned—which depicts women central to computing history: ENIAC programmers Betty Holberton and Jean Bartik, textile artist and scholar Anni Albers, mathematician Ada Lovelace, and Navy programmer Grace Hopper.

 

Juliana Wisdom


“It’s just kind of bursting at the seams with opulence and femininity,” artist Juliana Wisdom says of historic, decorative porcelain. Her research centered around The Huntington’s collection of Sèvres porcelain. It was all made in the 18th and 19th centuries, often by uncredited women who worked from home, carting delicate objects back and forth to the Sèvres manufactory. She searched for traces of these female workers in the Sèvres manufactory directories owned by The Huntington, and also researched the women who patronized the manufactory. Her research informed the ceramic sculptures—multiple vessels, a wig, and a wig stand—that she made herself. Her vessels not only incorporate decorative elements inspired by Sèvres porcelain, but also suggest, through their forms and the imagery, a different story about women’s labor. The vessel titled Three Graces and Marie Antoinette features a painted portrait of the executed queen, who invested in decorative porcelain. The “graces” who surround her represent three classes: common people, the bourgeoisie, and the aristocracy. In exploring and reimaging the legacy of the Sèvres manufactory, Wisdom is acknowledging both female labor and the class struggles affecting life in 18th- and 19th-century France. “Studying how these objects were made and who made them can be a way to transform how we think about history,” she says.

 

Olivia Chumacero and Sarita Dougherty


Painter Sarita Dougherty usually works from life, so she brought her oil paints to The Huntington’s gardens. Her collaborator, Olivia Chumacero, brought her video camera and sound equipment, and the two worked to capture the symbiotic relationships of plants growing in the gardens. In the past, Dougherty and Chumacero have worked collaboratively on research, performances, and installations honoring nature. Chumacero founded the organization Everything is Medicine, an organization that teaches people about indigenous uses of California flora. The two artists worked primarily in an uncultivated area of The Huntington’s grounds not open to the public, where the plants are much less manicured. In the spring, they took inspiration from the Ceonothus, or California lilac, bloom. In autumn, both connected with the elegant Oaxacan weeping pine. Dougherty created two paintings and designed wallpaper depicting California plants and animals at The Huntington. Chumacero filmed the spring bloom and dormant season on the grounds, recording sounds of the gardens to accompany her footage. Together, the two artists captured this ecosystem’s interrelationships and its connection to humanity.

 

Zya Levy


“I really view plants as storytellers,” says botanist and artist Zya Levy. At The Huntington, Levy explored different kinds of narratives—for instance, that of the golden barrel cactus, of which The Huntington has 500 specimens. The ball-shaped plant once existed only in a volcanic valley in Mexico. Thanks to over-zealous plant collectors and flooding caused by a dam project, the cactus became endangered in its native habitat. Counterintuitively, the golden barrel is now ubiquitous in Los Angeles as a landscaping choice. Levy’s interest in the effects that plant collecting and its legacy have on everyday realities informed her work at The Huntington. She made 300 plaster casts of cacti, based on models found at Home Depot, Sal’s Cactus Mart in Filmore, California, and on street corners. 150 of these are on view in “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington.” Levy also recorded ambient sounds in Eaton Canyon, L.A.’s streets, The Huntington’s gardens, and in New Mexico. The sounds narrate the movement of species from wild to urban settings, and from uncultivated to cultivated environments. In addition, she planned three hour-long walking tours for the public: one in downtown L.A., one in Highland Park, and one in The Huntington’s Desert Garden. At these tours, Levy told the stories of plants that grow in these environments, emphasizing where they come from, what they’ve been used for, and why they’re here now.

 

events


Bodies of Lineage
9.14.17 (Thursday) 7pm
@ Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington


A movement, a moment—a fleeting phrase to remind you of where you began and who you’ve become. Join us for an intimate evening of song, dance, and narrative in an event crafted by artist Jheanelle Garriques of Naked Narratives, in collaboration with the Sokamba Performing Arts Company. The presentation is inspired by the 18th-century feminist Elizabeth Montagu, founder of the literary salon known as the Blue Stockings Society. Montagu’s papers are part of The Huntington’s collections. In Montagu’s tradition, Naked Narratives has hosted feminist coteries around the globe using storytelling to uplift and empower marginalized voices. This presentation will feature queer and femme poets, musicians, and dancers of color sharing their stories, engaging with themes rooted in the body and the human experience.

Location: Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

 

Lesbian Pulp
9.29.17 (Friday) 7–10pm
10.7.17 (Saturday) 4–9pm
10.8.17 (Sunday) 5–9pm
@ Women’s Center for Creative Work

Artist Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh) leads a series of paper-making workshops in a program called Lesbian Pulp, an experiment in queer community, storytelling, and historiography.  Participants will use recycled materials (such as lesbian pulp novels and personal ephemera) to create paper on which to write love letters and stories of encounter. The program is a component of “What You Love,” a project produced by Loveday as part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Participants may attend individual sessions or the full series. Free; advanced reservations required.

For more information, contact info@wccw.us

 

Location: Women’s Center for Creative Work

Session descriptions:

9.29.17 – Potluck and show-and-tell. Participants should bring materials they wish to recycle into “lesbian pulp.” The group will get to know each other in a casual social environment by sharing the stories of the materials they’ve brought. A movie screening and discussion of a mystery lesbian pulp film will conclude the evening.

10.7.17 – Paper-making workshop. Participants will be guided through the process of paper-making, using materials they have brought to recycle into “lesbian pulp.” Over a casual potluck dinner, the group will share stories and work collaboratively.

10.8.17 – Storytelling and letter writing workshop. Participants will share, work collaboratively, and write their stories or letters on the paper they have made.

Garden Tour Series
A Walk on the Prickly Side: The Desert Garden at The Huntington
11.11.17 (Saturday) 9:30–10:30am
Cactus Amongst Us: Neighborhood Tour in Highland Park
11.11.17 (Saturday) 4pm
Downtown Desert: Landscape Tour at Grand Park
11.12.17 (Sunday) 2 pm

Botanist Zya Levy will lead a series of walking tours exploring the botanical histories and cultural uses of plants that can be found growing throughout Southern California—in The Huntington’s 10-acre Desert Garden, around a local community, and in a downtown Los Angeles park. Tours will highlight plants that are common horticulturally but rare in the wild, and will include discussion about the effects of botanical collections on biodiversity in both urban and wild spaces.  This program is a part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Free; reservations required. Space is limited.

For more information, contact info@wccw.us

 

LOCATIONS:

Desert Garden, The Huntington
Highland Park, CA
Grand Park, Downtown L.A.

exhibition: exhibition&nbsp

Exhibition: COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington
11.18.17–2.12.18


The exhibition “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington,” on view in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art from Nov. 18, 2017 through Feb. 12, 2018, features an installation of paintings, sculpture, a textile, video, writings, and other new works by artists Olivia Chumacero, Sarita Dougherty, Jheanelle Garriques, Zya S. Levy, Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh), Soyoung Shin, and Juliana Wisdom.

Live Free or Die:
Artist Talk with Soyoung Shin and Juliana Wisdom
1.27.18 (Saturday) 2pm
@ Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

Artists Soyoung Shin and Juliana Wisdom will discuss the influences of French history on their new work, inspired by French decorative art at The Huntington. The conversation is moderated by Catherine Hess, chief curator of European art at The Huntington and interim director of the Art Collections. Shin’s project, “Picture Elements” (named for the words from which “pixel” is derived) focuses on the 18th-century carpets and tapestries commissioned by King Louis XIV for the Grand Gallery of the Louvre, and explores the ways in which the textile craft overlaps with modern computing.  Wisdom is developing new work in response to The Huntington’s 18th-century French porcelain collection. Emulating the Sèvres Manufactory’s techniques with both traditional and new materials, Wisdom has created sculptures that seek to broaden the historical narrative of Sèvres production by including the often-anonymous women who served as both makers and benefactors. This program is a part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Free; no reservations required.

Location: Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

Bodies of Lineage
9.14.17 (Thursday) 7pm
@ Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington


A movement, a moment—a fleeting phrase to remind you of where you began and who you’ve become. Join us for an intimate evening of song, dance, and narrative in an event crafted by artist Jheanelle Garriques of Naked Narratives, in collaboration with the Sokamba Performing Arts Company. The presentation is inspired by the 18th-century feminist Elizabeth Montagu, founder of the literary salon known as the Blue Stockings Society. Montagu’s papers are part of The Huntington’s collections. In Montagu’s tradition, Naked Narratives has hosted feminist coteries around the globe using storytelling to uplift and empower marginalized voices. This presentation will feature queer and femme poets, musicians, and dancers of color sharing their stories, engaging with themes rooted in the body and the human experience.

Location: Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

 

Lesbian Pulp
9.29.17 (Friday) 7–10pm
10.7.17 (Saturday) 4–9pm
10.8.17 (Sunday) 5–9pm
@ Women’s Center for Creative Work

Artist Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh) leads a series of paper-making workshops in a program called Lesbian Pulp, an experiment in queer community, storytelling, and historiography.  Participants will use recycled materials (such as lesbian pulp novels and personal ephemera) to create paper on which to write love letters and stories of encounter. The program is a component of “What You Love,” a project produced by Loveday as part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Participants may attend individual sessions or the full series. Free; advanced reservations required.

For more information, contact info@wccw.us

 

Location: Women’s Center for Creative Work

Session descriptions:

9.29.17 – Potluck and show-and-tell. Participants should bring materials they wish to recycle into “lesbian pulp.” The group will get to know each other in a casual social environment by sharing the stories of the materials they’ve brought. A movie screening and discussion of a mystery lesbian pulp film will conclude the evening.

10.7.17 – Paper-making workshop. Participants will be guided through the process of paper-making, using materials they have brought to recycle into “lesbian pulp.” Over a casual potluck dinner, the group will share stories and work collaboratively.

10.8.17 – Storytelling and letter writing workshop. Participants will share, work collaboratively, and write their stories or letters on the paper they have made.

Garden Tour Series
A Walk on the Prickly Side: The Desert Garden at The Huntington
11.11.17 (Saturday) 9:30–10:30am
Cactus Amongst Us: Neighborhood Tour in Highland Park
11.11.17 (Saturday) 4pm
Downtown Desert: Landscape Tour at Grand Park
11.12.17 (Sunday) 2 pm

Botanist Zya Levy will lead a series of walking tours exploring the botanical histories and cultural uses of plants that can be found growing throughout Southern California—in The Huntington’s 10-acre Desert Garden, around a local community, and in a downtown Los Angeles park. Tours will highlight plants that are common horticulturally but rare in the wild, and will include discussion about the effects of botanical collections on biodiversity in both urban and wild spaces.  This program is a part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Free; reservations required. Space is limited.

For more information, contact info@wccw.us

 

LOCATIONS:

Desert Garden, The Huntington
Highland Park, CA
Grand Park, Downtown L.A.

exhibition: exhibition 

Exhibition: COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington
11.18.17–2.12.18


The exhibition “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington,” on view in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art from Nov. 18, 2017 through Feb. 12, 2018, features an installation of paintings, sculpture, a textile, video, writings, and other new works by artists Olivia Chumacero, Sarita Dougherty, Jheanelle Garriques, Zya S. Levy, Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh), Soyoung Shin, and Juliana Wisdom.

Live Free or Die:
Artist Talk with Soyoung Shin and Juliana Wisdom
1.27.18 (Saturday) 2pm
@ Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

Artists Soyoung Shin and Juliana Wisdom will discuss the influences of French history on their new work, inspired by French decorative art at The Huntington. The conversation is moderated by Catherine Hess, chief curator of European art at The Huntington and interim director of the Art Collections. Shin’s project, “Picture Elements” (named for the words from which “pixel” is derived) focuses on the 18th-century carpets and tapestries commissioned by King Louis XIV for the Grand Gallery of the Louvre, and explores the ways in which the textile craft overlaps with modern computing.  Wisdom is developing new work in response to The Huntington’s 18th-century French porcelain collection. Emulating the Sèvres Manufactory’s techniques with both traditional and new materials, Wisdom has created sculptures that seek to broaden the historical narrative of Sèvres production by including the often-anonymous women who served as both makers and benefactors. This program is a part of The Huntington’s contemporary arts initiative /five, in partnership with Women’s Center for Creative Work. Free; no reservations required.

Location: Rothenberg Hall, The Huntington

stories


aboutsm_five


/five is a contemporary art initiative centered on five year-long collaborations between The Huntington and a variety of arts and cultural organizations. The aim is to engage The Huntington’s rich library, garden, and art collections in new and thought-provoking ways. Possible outcomes include site-specific installations, educational programming, performance pieces, sound work, film, or myriad other art forms.

 

Each year’s collaboration will be announced toward the start of the calendar year. Information, photos, and stories about each collaboration and the associated artworks and events will be added to this site as they become available.

 

The /five initiative is made possible by a generous gift from The Cheng Family Foundation.

Additional funding for the second year of /five was provided by a grant from the Pasadena Art Alliance.